European Parliament Library

Cardiovascular toxicity and therapeutic modalities targeting cardio-oncology, from basic research to advanced study, edited by Imteyaz Qamar and Pawan Kumar Maurya

Label
Cardiovascular toxicity and therapeutic modalities targeting cardio-oncology, from basic research to advanced study, edited by Imteyaz Qamar and Pawan Kumar Maurya
Language
eng
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary Form
non fiction
Main title
Cardiovascular toxicity and therapeutic modalities targeting cardio-oncology
Nature of contents
bibliographydictionaries
Responsibility statement
edited by Imteyaz Qamar and Pawan Kumar Maurya
Sub title
from basic research to advanced study
Table Of Contents
Intro -- Cardiovascular Toxicity and Therapeutic Modalities Targeting Cardio-oncology: From Basic Research to Advanced Study -- Copyright -- Contents -- Contributors -- Preface -- Chapter 1 Overview of changes in the cardiovascular system -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Circulatory system -- 2.1 Pulmonary circulation -- 2.2 Systemic circulation -- 3 Blood vessels -- 3.1 Veins -- 3.2 Arteries -- 3.3 Capillaries -- 4 Heart valves -- 5 Physiology of heart -- 6 Cardiac cycle -- 7 Heart sounds -- 8 Heart rate -- 9 Blood -- 10 Effects on the cardiovascular system due to various physical/environmental factors -- 10.1 Effects due to aging -- 10.2 Effects due to exercise -- 10.3 Effects due to anesthetics -- 11 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 2 Cardiovascular disease in cancer survivors: Risk and management -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Section 1: Underlying risk factors: Genetic and environmental -- 2.1 Common risk factors -- 2.2 Genetic risk factors -- 2.3 Environmental risk factors -- 2.3.1 Inflammation in CVD and cancer -- 2.3.2 Air pollution -- 2.3.3 Tobacco use and smoking -- 2.3.4 Alcohol consumption -- 2.3.5 Diet -- 2.3.6 Organic and inorganic chemicals -- 3 Section 2: Health behaviors: Overweight and obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and metabolic ... -- 3.1 Metabolic syndrome -- 3.2 Overweight and obesity -- 3.3 Insulin resistance -- 3.4 Hyperlipidemia -- 3.5 Hypertension -- 4 Section 3: Management of risk factors -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3 Recent trends in cancer immunotherapy: Pathways and inhibitors -- 1 Introduction -- 2 CTLA-4 and PD-1 pathways -- 2.1 Immune therapy -- 3 PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways -- 3.1 Immune therapy -- 4 Concluding remarks -- References -- Chapter 4 Stroke risk assessment and atrial fibrillation (AF) in cancer patients -- 1 Introduction2 Association between cancer and atrial fibrillation (AF) -- 3 Management and treatment modalities of AF -- References -- Chapter 5 Biochemistry of biomarkers in cardiotoxicity induced in chemotherapeutic drugs -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Biomarker discovery pipeline -- 3 Prevalence of cancer and its management strategies -- 3.1 Radiation therapy -- 3.2 Chemotherapy -- 4 Cardiotoxicity due to anticancer therapy -- 4.1 Effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) -- 4.2 Thrombosis -- 4.3 Cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction -- 5 Biomarkers and its molecular aspects in cardiotoxicity -- 5.1 Cardiac troponins (cTn) -- 5.2 Natriuretic peptides (NPs) -- 5.3 Inflammatory biomarkers -- 5.4 Ischemic biomarkers -- 5.5 Biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction -- 6 Future challenges and concluding remarks -- Acknowledgment -- Funding -- Conflict of interest -- Availability of data and materials -- Authors' contribution -- Ethics approval -- Consent for publication -- References -- Chapter 6 Cardiotoxic effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors directed against VEGFR -- 1 Tumor angiogenesis -- 2 VEGF signaling pathway in angiogenesis -- 3 VEGF pathway inhibitors for cancer treatment -- 4 Cardiotoxic effects of VEGF pathway inhibitors -- 4.1 Bevacizumab -- 4.1.1 Clinical studies -- 4.1.2 Mechanistic studies -- 4.2 Ramucirumab -- 4.3 Sunitinib -- 4.3.1 Clinical studies -- 4.3.2 Mechanistic studies -- 4.4 Sorafenib -- 4.4.1 Clinical studies -- 4.4.2 Mechanistic studies -- 4.5 Pazopanib -- 4.6 Regorafenib -- 4.7 Vandetanib -- 4.8 Cabozantinib -- 4.9 Axitinib -- 5 Cardioprotective agents -- 6 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 7 Critical insights into cardiotoxicity of anthracyclines -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Mechanism underlying anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity -- 2.1 DNA intercalation -- 2.2 Topoisomerase II poison2.3 Reactive oxygen species -- 2.4 DNA adduct formation -- 3 Molecular mechanism of DOX-mediated cardiotoxicity -- 4 Physiological functions of the redox system in CV toxicity -- 5 Strategies to limit doxorubicin cardiotoxicity -- 6 Summary -- References -- Chapter 8 Noninvasive cardiovascular imaging techniques -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Pretest considerations: Patient history and physical examination -- 2 Echocardiology -- 2.1 Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) -- 2.2 Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) -- 2.3 Stress echocardiography -- 2.4 Three-dimensional echocardiography (3D Echo) -- 2.5 Contrast echocardiography -- 3 Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) -- 4 Cardiac computed tomography -- 5 Radionucleotide imaging -- 6 Myocardial perfusion imaging -- 7 Summary -- References -- Chapter 9 Cardiovascular risk induced by radiotherapy -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Cardiotoxicity -- 3 Risk factors -- 4 Physiopathology -- 5 Heart failure (HF) -- 5.1 Incidence and clinical presentation -- 5.2 Radiation toxicity -- 5.3 Monitoring of cardiotoxicity -- 5.4 Acute and late injuries -- 5.5 Prevention of cardiotoxicity -- 6 Myocardial ischemia -- 7 Systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) -- 7.1 Clinical manifestations/diagnosis -- 7.2 Treatment -- 8 Arrhythmias -- 8.1 Clinical manifestations/diagnosis -- 8.2 Treatment -- 9 Thromboembolism -- 9.1 Diagnosis and risk factors -- 9.2 Prophylaxis -- 10 Cardiotoxicity associated with radiotherapy (RT) -- 10.1 Pericardial diseases and cancer -- 10.1.1 Diagnosis -- 10.1.2 Treatment -- 10.2 Valves -- 10.3 Driving system -- 10.4 Cardiomyopathies -- 10.5 Cardiotoxicity and thymus diseases -- 10.6 Cardiotoxicity for malignant mesotheliomas -- 10.7 Cardiotoxicity after craniospinal irradiation -- 10.8 Cardiotoxicity after total body irradiation11 Recommendations for follow-up after radiotherapy -- 12 Modern radiotherapy techniques -- References -- Chapter 10 Cardiovascular complication from cancer therapy -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Vascular conditions -- 2.1 Atherosclerosis -- 3 Cancer therapy vs atherosclerosis -- 3.1 Cancer therapy vs hypertension -- 3.2 Arterial thrombosis -- 3.3 Pulmonary embolus -- 4 Cardiac structural problem -- 4.1 Valvular heart disease -- 4.2 Pericardial effusion -- 4.3 Cardiac conduction diseases -- 5 Cardiac dysfunction and heart failure -- 5.1 Radiation therapy -- 5.2 Antiangiogenic therapy -- 5.3 Trastuzumab -- References -- Chapter 11 Novel anticancer drugs related to cardiotoxicity -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Clinically used cardioprotective drugs against cardiotoxicity -- 2.1 Dexrazoxane -- 2.2 Antioxidants -- 2.3 Statins -- 2.4 GPCRs -- 3 GPCR-targeted cardioprotective strategies against anticancer-induced cardiotoxicity -- 3.1 β -Blockers -- 3.2 Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers -- 4 Newly identified GPCR agonist against anticancer-mediated cardiotoxicity -- 4.1 Alpha-adrenergic receptor -- 4.2 Adenosine receptor agonists -- 4.3 Ghrelin receptor agonist -- 4.4 Galanin receptor agonists -- 4.5 Melatonin receptor agonists -- 4.6 Apelin receptor agonists -- 4.7 Cannabidiol -- 5 Conclusion -- Conflict of interest -- Ethics approval -- Consent for publication -- References -- Chapter 12 Principles of cardiovascular rehabilitation -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Cardiopulmonary stress testing in prehabilitation, habilitation, and rehabilitation -- 3 Cardiopulmonary exercise testing -- 4 CPET protocol -- 5 Oxygen assimilation -- 6 Respiratory switch ratio -- 7 Ventilator anaerobic ratio -- 8 Positive outcomes of cardiac rehabilitation -- 8.1 Aerobic capacity -- 8.1.1 Expected outcomes8.2 Nutrient -- 8.2.1 Expected outcomes -- 8.3 Smoking -- 8.3.1 Expected outcomes -- 8.4 Alcohol drinking -- 8.5 Behavioral and technical problems management -- 8.5.1 Expected outcomes -- 9 Risk factor for prehabilitation -- 10 Phases of cardiac rehabilitation -- 10.1 Phase 1 -- 10.2 Phase 2 -- 10.3 Phase 3 -- 10.4 Phase 4 -- 11 Is rehabilitation too late? -- 12 A paradigm shift in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation -- References -- Chapter 13 Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sources of cells, cryopreservation, and applications -- 1 Introduction -- 2 History and evolution of HSC and HSCT -- 3 Sources of HSCs -- 3.1 Peripheral blood -- 3.2 Bone marrow -- 3.3 Umbilical cord blood -- 4 Preservation and storage of HSCs -- 5 Applications of HSCT -- 5.1 HSCT in primary immunodeficiency diseases -- 5.1.1 X-linked SCID and JAK3 deficiency -- 5.1.2 IL-7 receptor deficiency -- 5.1.3 Recombination-activating genes deficiency -- 5.2 HSCT in autoimmune diseases -- 5.2.1 Multiple sclerosis -- 5.2.2 Systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus -- 5.2.3 Crohn's disease -- 5.3 HSCT in malignancies and cancer -- 6 Complications of HSCT in recipients -- 6.1 Immune-mediated complications -- 6.2 Infections -- 6.3 Secondary malignancies -- 6.4 Medical and procedural risks -- 6.4.1 Developing nontoxic conditioning regimens -- 6.4.2 Immune reconstitution -- 6.4.3 Tissue mismatch -- 6.4.4 Immune evasion -- 7 Summary -- References -- Index
Classification
Content

Incoming Resources