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Shining a Light on the Mysteries of State :, The Origins of Fiscal Transparency in Western Europe, Timothy Irwin

Label
Shining a Light on the Mysteries of State :, The Origins of Fiscal Transparency in Western Europe, Timothy Irwin
Language
eng
Abstract
The extent of fiscal transparency in Western Europe has varied over the centuries. Although ancient Greek, Roman, and medieval governments were sometimes open about their finances, the absolute monarchies of the 1600s and 1700s shrouded them in mystery. Factors that have encouraged transparency include (i) the sharing of political power and rulers’ need to persuade creditors to lend and taxpayers’ representatives to approve new taxes; (ii) the spread of technological innovations that reduce the costs of storing and transmitting information; and (iii) the acceptance of political theories that emphasize accountable government and public discussion of government policy
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
resource.governmentPublication
international or intergovernmental publication
Literary Form
non fiction
Main title
Shining a Light on the Mysteries of State :
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Responsibility statement
Timothy Irwin
Series statement
IMF Working Papers
Sub title
The Origins of Fiscal Transparency in Western Europe
Table Of Contents
Cover; Contents; I. Overview; II. Fiscal Transparency in Ancient Greece and Rome; III. Accountability in the Medieval City-States of Northern Italy; IV. Medieval Parliamentary Scrutiny of Royal Accounts; V. Absolutism and Fiscal Secrecy in the 1600s and 1700s; Figures; 1. England: Index of the Real Price of Books, 1300-1860; Tables; 1. Adoption of Double-Entry Bookkeeping by Selected European Governments; VI. British Parliamentary Demands for Information in the 1600s; VII. The French Government's 1781 Report on Public Finances; 2. United Kingdom: Public Debt, 1692-2010VIII. Acceptance of the Principle of Transparency in the Late 1700sIX. An "Avalanche of Data," 1820-1850; 2. Early Publication of Budgets or Accounts; X. Debates about the Details; XI. Conclisions; References
Classification
Content
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