European Parliament Library

Winning by process, the state and neutralization of ethnic minorities in Myanmar, Jacques Bertrand, Alexandre Pelletier, and Ardeth Maung Thawnghmung.

Label
Winning by process, the state and neutralization of ethnic minorities in Myanmar, Jacques Bertrand, Alexandre Pelletier, and Ardeth Maung Thawnghmung.
Language
eng
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Intended audience
Specialized
Literary form
non fiction
Main title
Winning by process
Medium
electronic resource
Nature of contents
dictionariesbibliography
Oclc number
12966880351336406357
Responsibility statement
Jacques Bertrand, Alexandre Pelletier, and Ardeth Maung Thawnghmung.
Series statement
Cornell scholarship online
Sub title
the state and neutralization of ethnic minorities in Myanmar
Summary
This book asks why the peace process in Myanmar stalled in the decade from 2011 to 2021 despite a liberalizing regime, a national ceasefire agreement, and a multilateral peace dialogue between the state and ethnic minorities. The book argues that stalled conflicts are more than pauses or stalemates. "Winning by process," as opposed to winning by war or agreement, represents the state's ability to gain advantage by manipulating the rules of negotiation, bargaining process, and sites of power and resources. In Myanmar, five such strategies allowed the state to gain through process: locking in, sequencing, layering, outflanking, and outgunning. The Myanmar case shows how process can shift the balance of power in negotiations intended to bring an end to civil war
Table of contents
Winning By Process : Leveraging Formal Negotiation, State Institutions and War -- The Failure to Win by War : The Limits of Bamar Dominance and Ethnic Minority Repression -- Democratization : Layering and Sequencing in the State Institutional Arena -- Process over War : From Ceasefire to Political Dialogue -- Normalizing Weak Ethnic States : Constitutional Lock-In and Implementing Layers -- Outflanking and the Erosion of de Facto Autonomy -- Fragmentation, Marginalization, and Subjugation : Layering and Locking-In Ethnic Recognition
Target audience
specialized