European Parliament Library

Transnational organised crime in international law, Tom Obokata

Label
Transnational organised crime in international law, Tom Obokata
Language
eng
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 231-242) and index
Index
no index present
Literary Form
non fiction
Main title
Transnational organised crime in international law
Oclc number
607975236
Responsibility statement
Tom Obokata
Series statement
Studies in international and comparative criminal law ;, v. 5
Summary
A monograph that offers a critical analysis of developments in the field of transnational organised crime under international law. It traces the history of organised crime and explores key concepts and norms relating to the practice from a multi-disciplinary perspective. It looks at legal obligations imposed upon States. There is extensive and detailed academic literature on the legal development of international crimes such as war crimes and crime against humanity. However, not much attention has been paid to other serious crimes, including narcotics-related offences, human trafficking and money laundering, which do not necessarily amount to international crimes in the traditional sense. The purpose of this monograph is to fill this gap and offer a critical analysis of developments in the field of transnational organised crime under international law. The book is divided into two parts. Part I is entitled 'Norms, Principles, and Concepts'. It traces the history of organised crime and explores key concepts and norms relating to the practice from a multi-disciplinary perspective. It then looks at legal obligations imposed upon States as well as non-State actors in relation to transnational organised crime. Part II illustrates how these norms, principles and obligations are translated and enforced in practice. This will be done through case studies at the level of national law (Thailand, Serbia and the UK), regional law (European Union) and international law (United Nations)
Table Of Contents
Introduction -- Understanding organised crime from a multi-disciplinary perspective -- Obligations of States under international law -- The role of non-state actors in suppression and prevention of organised crime -- National case studies of Thailand, Serbia, Kosovo, and the UK -- The EU and transnational organised crime -- International responses to transnational organised crime
Classification
Mapped to