European Parliament Library

Curriculum challenges for universities, agenda for change, edited by James Nyland and David Davies

Label
Curriculum challenges for universities, agenda for change, edited by James Nyland and David Davies
Language
eng
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary Form
non fiction
Main title
Curriculum challenges for universities
Nature of contents
bibliographydictionaries
Oclc number
1302010911
Responsibility statement
edited by James Nyland and David Davies
Sub title
agenda for change
Table Of Contents
Intro -- Foreword -- Contents -- Editors and Contributors -- Introduction: Setting the Scene -- Part I Critical Thinking and Engagement -- 1 Critical Thinking for an Engaged University -- 1.1 The Problems -- 1.2 A Democratic Education Relevant to the Digital Age? -- 1.3 What Should Drive Our Knowledge in the Digital Era? -- 1.3.1 The Need for a Social Identity -- 1.4 The Need for Critical Dialogue not Alliances of the Silent -- 1.5 Critical Thinking: Content and Process -- 1.6 Concepts and Processes for Critical Thinking: An Outline Sketch -- 1.7 Processes of Learning for Critical Thinking: Indicative Capacities -- 1.8 Outcomes and Actual Critical Thinking Techniques -- 1.9 Personal Commitment and Learning -- 1.10 Reflexive Criticality -- References -- 2 The University's Social and Civic Role: Time for an Appraisal -- 2.1 Aspect 1 -- 2.1.1 The Civic Role and Community Engagement-Achieving Social Justice Through Education -- 2.1.2 Universities for Students or Citizens? -- 2.1.3 Adult Learning and Education -- 2.1.4 Community Engagement -- 2.1.5 The Role of Cultural Knowledge -- 2.2 Aspect 2 -- 2.2.1 The Meaning of Critical Thinking for the Higher Education Curriculum -- 2.2.2 Crisis, Poverty and the Future -- 2.2.3 The Digital World and the Human Mind -- 2.2.4 Young People and an Uncertain Future -- 2.2.5 Knowledge and Skills -- 2.2.6 Community and Curriculum -- 2.2.7 The University and Democratic Citizen-Members? -- 2.2.8 Learning for Engagement -- 2.2.9 Social Knowing and Skill -- 2.2.10 Critical Thinking -- 2.3 In Conclusion -- References -- 3 The University as a Public Educator: Learning and Teaching for Engagement -- 3.1 What of Work Integrated Learning (WIL) in the Universities? -- 3.2 What of Service Learning in the Universities? -- 3.3 The Australian Carnegie Community Engagement Classification Initiative3.4 Critical Thinking for Engagement -- 3.5 Pay Attention! A Problem to Be Addressed -- 3.6 Cognitive Concerns: Control Yourself -- 3.7 Focus on What Matters -- 3.8 Attention, Self and Skill -- 3.9 Thinking and Being -- 3.10 Being in the Digital World -- 3.11 Surveillance Capitalism-A New Era -- 3.12 The Problems We Are Addressing: Learning and Teaching -- 3.13 The Need for Renewal -- 3.14 Learning and Teaching Strategies -- 3.15 Learning Entrepreneurially and Personal Viability -- 3.16 A Critical Curriculum for Universities in Practice -- 3.17 Some Practical Steps -- 3.18 In Conclusion -- References -- 4 A Crisis of Knowledge: Themes for an Engaged University Curriculum -- 4.1 Global Change but Local Lives: The Need for a Critical University Curriculum -- 4.2 The Problems We Are Addressing -- 4.3 The Problems Out There -- 4.4 Future Learning and the Digital Age -- 4.5 Community and Engagement -- 4.6 What Makes a Community in the Twenty-First Century? -- 4.7 Who Belongs in a Community or Nation? -- 4.8 An Engaged Curriculum for Critical Thinking: What Do We Need to Know? -- 4.9 Critical Thinking -- References -- 5 Freedom Through Education: A Promise Postponed -- 5.1 Threads Through Time: The Challenges to Higher Education -- 5.2 Where Are We Now? -- 5.3 Future Prospects: Learning for Creativity -- 5.4 A Critical and Dynamic Curriculum for an Uncertain World -- 5.5 The Meaning of Vocational and Academic Education -- 5.6 The Social Purpose of the University: The Promise Denied? -- 5.7 Conclusion: A Promise Postponed -- References -- Part II Engagement, Culture and Democracy -- 6 Academic and Scholarly Freedom: Towards a 'Disputing' University with Critically Engaged Students -- 6.1 An Australian Debate -- 6.2 The Civic Role of the University -- 6.3 A Disputing University? -- 6.4 The Meaning of Critical Thinking and the Curriculum of Universities6.4.1 Poverty is Still with Us - Globally and Locally -- 6.4.2 The Marginalisation of Young People -- 6.4.3 The Growth of Digital Technologies and How We Understand What is Happening -- 6.4.4 Knowledge and Learning Relevant to Life and Work -- 6.4.5 Relevance of Community and Identity -- 6.5 An Engaged Curriculum for Critical Thinking -- 6.6 What Do We Need to Know? -- References -- 7 Towards a Twenty-First-Century Approach to Civic Engagement Locally: A Conversation Between Professor James Nyland and Dr. Richard Teare, Co-founder and President, Global University for Lifelong Learning -- 7.1 Wider Engagement: The Role of Self-directed Development -- 7.1.1 About This Chapter -- 7.2 Q: Why Did You Establish GULL? -- 7.3 Q: Why Does GULL Focus on Self-help? -- 7.4 Q: How Does GULL Facilitate Self-help? -- 7.5 Q: Do You Have an Example that Illustrates the Value of Self-help? -- 7.6 Q: Does GULL Work with Academic Institutions? -- 7.7 Q: Has GULL's Self-help Approach Been Used in Australia? -- 7.8 Q: Can You Envision a Wider-Ranging Partnership with Universities in the Future? -- 7.9 Q: Given the Positive Outcomes, Will Gull's Work with South African Universities Expand? -- 7.10 Summary Points -- 7.11 Implications -- 7.12 Q: How Could Universities Become More Inclusive Hubs for Academic and Community-Led Learning? -- Reference -- 8 Indigenous Knowledge in Australia: Imagining a Different Society -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Identity Questions as the Conjuncture -- 8.3 Frameworks for Understanding -- 8.4 The Original Australians and the Contemporary World -- 8.4.1 First Contact: Worlds Apart -- 8.5 Cultural Conservatism and Change -- 8.6 Questions of Land: The Making and Meaning of the Landscape -- 8.7 Aboriginal Knowledge: How We Think About the Issues -- 8.8 Language and Loss -- 8.9 Knowledge, Nature, Culture and Identity8.10 What Kind of Social Knowledge is Needed Now? -- 8.11 Contexts for Knowing: Environment and Human Development -- 8.12 Re-assessing Practical Knowledge -- 8.13 Indigenous People and Learning: Are the Paradigms Beginning to Shift? -- 8.14 Conclusion -- References -- Part III The Future: Slow Burn or Fast Forward -- 9 The Burning World: Transformation and Sustainability or Apocalypse? -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 We Have Made a Burning World -- 9.3 The Environmental Crisis is a Social and Economic Crisis -- 9.4 Averting the Disaster -- 9.5 Can We Seize Back the Debate? -- 9.6 The Importance of Sustainable Development -- References -- 10 Ways of Knowing: Towards an Ecology of Learning and Community -- 10.1 Crises and Paradoxes -- 10.2 Lessons Learned -- 10.3 The Universities as the New 'Rust Belt'? -- 10.4 Points of Departure -- 10.5 Towards an Ecology of Learning and Community -- 10.6 Places Matter -- 10.7 Learning and the Ecology of Community -- 10.8 Imagining and Understanding Our Cosmos -- 10.9 Conclusion -- References -- 11 The New Normal After Coronavirus: Is There Anyone Here from Education? -- 11.1 Understanding and Learning About Ourselves -- 11.2 New Challenges in a Changed World -- 11.3 Living with the Here and Now and Future? -- 11.4 Looking Ahead -- 11.5 What Will Universities Do? -- 11.6 The New Normal? -- 11.7 The Implications for Education -- 11.8 What We Have Learned from the Pandemic -- 11.9 In Conclusion -- References -- Part IV Conclusion -- 12 Learning that Matters -- 12.1 Learning that Matters -- Sources and Origins -- Part I Critical Thinking and Engagement -- Part II Engagement, Culture and Democracy -- Part III The Future: Slow Burn or Fast Forward -- Part IV Conclusion -- Note to the Reader
Classification
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