European Parliament Library

Netherlands yearbook of international law 2021, a greener international law--international legal responses to the global environmental crisis, Daniëlla Dam-de Jong and Fabian Amtenbrink, editors

Label
Netherlands yearbook of international law 2021, a greener international law--international legal responses to the global environmental crisis, Daniëlla Dam-de Jong and Fabian Amtenbrink, editors
Language
eng
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary Form
non fiction
Main title
Netherlands yearbook of international law 2021
Nature of contents
dictionariesbibliography
Oclc number
1378609580
Responsibility statement
Daniëlla Dam-de Jong and Fabian Amtenbrink, editors
Series statement
Netherlands Yearbook of International Law,, 52, 1574-0951
Sub title
a greener international law--international legal responses to the global environmental crisis
Summary
This book engages with international legal responses to the global environmental crisis. Humanity faces a triple planetary crisis, consisting of the interlinked problems of climate change, depletion of biological diversity and pollution.The chapters in this volume of the Netherlands Yearbook of International Law address important questions of how and to what extent these environmental concerns have been integrated into international law, who or what drives these developments, and what all of this tells us about international law’s ability to tackle the challenges that a deteriorating environment brings for the future of life on Earth. The strength of the volume is that it brings together a wide range of perspectives on the ‘greening’ phenomenon in international law. It includes perspectives from international environmental law, human rights law, investment law, financial law, humanitarian law and criminal law. Moreover, it raises important questions regarding the validity of the predominant approach in international law to (the protection of) nature. By providing such a wide range of perspectives on international legal responses (or lack thereof) to the environmental crisis, the volume seeks to engage scholars and practitioners from a variety of disciplines. It invites readers to compare the state-of-the-art across disciplines and to reflect on ways to strengthen international law’s responses to the environmental crisis. Furthermore, as has become standard for the Netherlands Yearbook of International Law, the second part consists of a section on Dutch practice in international law. The Netherlands Yearbook of International Law was first published in 1970. It offers a forum for the publication of scholarly articles in a varying thematic area of public international law. Chapter 3 is available open access under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License via link.springer.com
Table Of Contents
Part I. The Greening Phenomenon in International Law -- Chapter 1. A Greener International Law: International Legal Responses to the Global Environmental Crisis -- Chapter 2. Remedies for Climate Change–A Decisive Push Towards Paris? -- Chapter 3. The Rights of Nature as a Legal Response to the Global Environmental Crisis? A Critical Review of International Law’s ‘Greening’ Agenda -- Chapter 4. Greening the Law of Environmental Protection in Armed Conflicts -- Chapter 5. From Anthropos to Oikos in International Criminal Law: Acritical-theoretical Exploration of Ecocide as an ‘Ecocentric’ Amendment to the Rome Statute -- Chapter 6. Greening International Investment Agreements -- Chapter 7. Climate Justice and The Greening of Investment Arbitration -- Chapter 8. The International Regulation and Coordination of Sustainable Finance -- Chapter 9. A Coalition of the Committed’: The Central Bank Supervisors Network for Greening the Financial System (NGFS) from a Perspective of Global Administrative Law -- Part II. Dutch Practice in International Law -- Chapter 10. Ziada vs Gantz and Eschel: A Civilian Claimant between Ship and Shore in The Netherlands -- Chapter 11. Reimagining the Energy Corporation: Milieudefensie and Others v Royal Dutch Shell Plc -- Chapter 12. Syrian War Crimes Trials in The Netherlands: Claiming Universal Jurisdiction over Terrorist Offences and the War Crime of Outrages upon Personal Dignity of the Dead -- Table of Cases -- Index
Classification
Content
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